Answers to today's legal questions through blogs and articles

Hiring an attorney

How Are Lawyers Paid

How Are Lawyers Paid?

One of the foremost questions people have on their minds when they find themselves in need of legal representation is, “How will I pay for this?” Naturally, those who are fortunate enough never to need an attorney will not have to worry, but many of us will at one time or another end up in a legal bind wherein hiring an attorney will be quite valuable. In those cases, it’s helpful to understand how lawyers are paid in order to decide which type of fee will work best for your particular situation. It’s also important to know that if you cannot afford an attorney, there are programs available that could help. Top lawyers are able to answer all your questions about the different fee options in the legal profession, such as contingency fees, hourly fees, fixed fees, and retainers. Following is a breakdown of what these mean and how they work.

It’s important to know that oftentimes the fee arrangement will be dependent upon which type of case you need representation for, such as divorce, criminal, foreclosure, landlord/tenant, etc. It may also be decided by the amount of research involved, how much time an attorney will need to spend in court, and the amount of time that will be needed to come to a resolution of your case.

How Does Divorce Work

How Does Divorce Work?

Sadly, the rate for marriage ending in divorce has escalated in the past few years/decades.  Once upon a time people married and stayed together, through thick and thin, for life.  Often, though there were irreconcilable differences, people stayed together for the sake of the kids as they knew the turbulence of divorce and the divisiveness that results is often difficult on the kids.  But sometimes the relationship becomes intolerable and you seek an exit, vowing that you will not let the kids suffer the consequences of this faltered relationship.

Employment Attorney

What to Ask an Employment Attorney

If you have a workplace related legal issue such as workplace bullying, discrimination, harassment of any type of unfair or unlawful termination, it might be time to meet up with an Employment attorney in New Jersey. This is of course, a worst case scenario.  One of the first things you should do is try to talk to the person in charge or to human resources to see what can be done – if anything.  If all else fails, then the next logical step would be to speak to a lawyer.  When it comes to meeting with a lawyer, make sure that you make the process as easy and smooth as you can.  Be sure to prepare a list of a few questions that you want to ask the lawyer.  Asking questions is a great way to see if you and the lawyer are a good match and if they can handle the situation at hand properly.  Here are a few of the questions you should be asking your Employment attorney if you are serious about the situation and need help.

What is Sexual Harassment?

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits sexual harassment which is a form of sexual discrimination. It is prohibited by law to harass an applicant or an employee based on their gender. Harassment can include a wide variety of actions such as unwelcome sexual advances, asking for a sexual favor, and many other verbal, non-verbal or physical actions that are of a sexual nature. However, even offensive remarks that are made about a person’s gender or sexuality can be considered sexual harassment. It is prohibited to make offensive remarks about women in general or men in general. Victims may be either male or female and victims do not have to be of the opposite sex. As a general rule, the law does not deal with incidents where there is simple teasing, silly comments or isolated incidents that do not escalate. However, when harassment becomes severe and creates a hostile work environment or an offensive work environment then the law is there to protect workers. A harasser can be a co-worker, an employer, supervisor, or even a person who is not employed by the company like a customer.

Benefits of a Chapter 13 Bankruptcy

Bankruptcy
Benefits of a Chapter 13

When an individual schedules an appointment to talk with a bankruptcy attorney in NJ they may be given several options including filing either a Chapter 7 or a Chapter 13 bankruptcy. If they have too much income they may not be able to file a Chapter 7 bankruptcy. But the Chapter 13 may be much more advantageous in some situations than the Chapter 7. There are certain situations where one option is better than the other and in many instances a Chapter 13 is preferred over a Chapter 7. InNew Jerseya Chapter 13 bankruptcy is the only available choice if you are behind on business payments or a mortgage and you still want to keep your property when the bankruptcy process is complete. When you file a Chapter 13 bankruptcy there is the unique opportunity to make up all of the overdue payments over an extended period of time and then reinstate the mortgage agreement that was originally made. Most of the time, the payment plan is developed to last for between 3 and 5 years.

Benefits of a Chapter 11 Bankruptcy

Bankruptcy
Benefits of a Chapter 11

A Chapter 11 bankruptcy is sometimes called a “business bankruptcy” even though it can also be a good choice for an individual. A Chapter 11 allows a business or debtor to continue their normal operations while they come up with a “plan for reorganization.” In some circumstances they can create a plan for liquidation as well. It is essential to discuss the particulars of the case with a bankruptcy attorney in NJ to determine if it is beneficial for a particular situation. Just like the other types of bankruptcy codes the debtor in a Chapter 11 bankruptcy is trying to get his debts discharged but very few of those who file for this type of bankruptcy come through it with the business and ownership still intact. In the vast majority of cases the Chapter 11 works to form a new entity even though it will usually have the same name as the old company which went bankrupt. The newly formed business typically has new management along with a new structure of ownership. But there remain some very distinct benefits to filing this particular type of bankruptcy.