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Condo Owner Rights

Condominium OwnersWhen it comes to owning a condo, it’s actually quite different than owning a single family home.  When it comes time to consider where you want to live; a condo or a single family home, it’s a good idea to consider these factors:  Resale Value, Privacy, Space, Cost, Amenities, Maintenance and more.  Essentially when you own a condo the “ownership” is just on the insides of the house.  Everything outside is usually a shared aspect i.e.; if you have a yard, it’s usually a shared yard.  If you are lucky enough, the housing association or builders may have separated the yards with a fence, but the condos are still going to be pretty close together.  While owning a condo does have its benefits, it also as per usual, has its drawbacks as well.  If you are trying to figure out if you want to buy a single home or a condo, here are a few things you might need to be aware of in each instance.

Legal Ethics for Paralegals

Legal ethics are obviously related to the legal system, but they are a set of standards and guidelines in where conduct is measured. Most anyone in the legal system will use NJ legal ethics, but they vary depending on the position and title you ascertain. For example, paralegals and lawyers both have rules of conduct, but because lawyers tend to deal more with clients one on one, they have different rules of conduct than a paralegal. But, the same sentiment remains – to keep the client protected via confidentiality, as well as keep the lawyer or paralegal protected as well. There are by far and wide, more rules for lawyers than paralegals, but here are a few things you might want to look over as far as legal ethics for paralegals.

Ethical Online Advertising and Web Design for Lawyers in NJ

The New Jersey Bar Association governs how a law firm or an attorney conducts themselves when engaging in advertising or when they are communicating via online media such as the Internet or websites. Since an attorney website is basically considered to be a form of communication or a means of advertising they are subject to being regulated by the bar’s rules. Each state may have its own set of rules regarding the handling of websites or advertisements by attorneys; and it is essential that an attorney abide by the rules and guidelines set in their individual state. In many cases, an attorney hires a third party to develop their professional website and therefore some of the guidelines can get overlooked. In these cases, an attorney can face disciplinary actions or sanctions if the rules set by the bar are violated whether knowingly or unknowingly.

Laws that Protect Whistleblowers

When pursuing a whistleblower case the first step is to carefully check all th laws ans statutes that may apply to your given situation. An example is that although the Whistleblower Protection Act is well?known and has been extensively talked about it only actually covers a small part of the working population. When trying a case and not a federal employee, the case gets covered under different rules of protection altogether. An employment lawyer can work with you to set up some specific laws that pertain to your case if you are going to seek legal recourse.

What is the Whistleblower Protection Act?

The Whistleblower Protection Act, or WPA, gives protection from retaliation or persecution to government employees that disclose to the police illegal and improper conduct that goes on in the workplace. The law is to protect any federal employees who uncover some wrongdoing and report it to authorities. Under the WPA, the government agency accused is not allowed to end the employment or “bully” a worker of government contractors, science based agencies like NASA, or national security personnel.

What is Chapter 13 Bankruptcy?

Chapter 13 Bankruptcy

A Chapter 13 bankruptcy will include a 3 to 5 year repayment plan which will allow a debtor to repay creditors by paying off total amounts or partial amounts of the debts. A Chapter 13 can prevent a foreclosure on a house, pay back taxes, and stop a tax debt from accruing interest, help make up missed payments on a house or car and any number of other things. As long as an individual stays to the proposed repayment schedule the remaining debt will be released at the end of the plan. There are several factors which help determine the exact amount that will have to be repaid. These factors include things like the disposable income that is available to the debtor. In order to be eligible to file for a Chapter 13 bankruptcy you will have to have a “regular” source of income as well as some amount of disposable income which can be applied toward the payment plan laid out in the Chapter 13 paperwork.

What is Chapter 7 Bankruptcy?

Chapter 7 Bankruptcy

Chapter 7 bankruptcy is generally filed to eliminate unsecure debt. A corporation, married couple, partnership or an individual can file for this type of bankruptcy. It typically discharges debts such as medical bills, personal loans and credit cards. In some cases, even though the Chapter 7 will free an individual from their debts, there are some types of property that they may be able to keep. They will just have to make arrangements which will reaffirm the debt. For most people the main reason for filing a Chapter 7 is to get rid of their debts while keeping most of their belongings including vehicles and homes.

Division of Property in a No Fault Divorce

Property Division
House Being Divided by Two Hands

Couples who file for divorce in New Jersey have the option of a no-fault or a fault-based divorce. In a no-fault divorce the parties agree that there are irreconcilable differences which simply means they lack the ability to get along any further and there’s not a chance that they will be able to work it out and get back together. Spouses seeking a no-fault divorce are not required to find fault with the other party or point to something bad which led up to the divorce. A no-fault divorce can be a simpler process and can be easier on the children who are involved.

What is Arbitration?

Legal Consult
Arbitration

Arbitration is a way to solve a dispute legally. An independent third party will determine the resolution to the dispute in a private setting. An arbitration hearing can use either a tribunal or an individual arbitrator. A tribunal is typically made up of several arbitrators. It is customary in most settings to have an odd number of tribunal members in order to avoid a tie. The parties who are involved in the dispute will hand their power to decide the dispute over to the arbitrator. Arbitration is just as binding and final as litigation and it is a valid alternative to going to court. It has been given the nickname the “business man’s method of resolving disputes.” However, the procedure is governed by both state and federal laws. Many states contain the provisions for Arbitration in their civil practice rules. This helps to provide a guideline for the procedures of Arbitration as well as how the arbitrator’s decision is to be handled. There are several states that have adopted the Uniform Arbitration Act while some states have laid out some very specific guidelines which govern arbitration.