Answers to today's legal questions through blogs and articles

Tag: NJ Divorce

What is a Collaborative Divorce?

Collaborate
Two People Putting a Puzzle Together

A divorce is never an easy situation to find oneself in; and many times proceedings can seem like they continue forever before they come to an end. A NJ family attorney can help couples file a collaborative divorce which is a new alternative to the traditional process. Collaborative divorce law allows the spouses to work with attorneys who will help them negotiate the terms of a divorce in a much friendlier and peaceful environment. Each spouse will hire a collaborative attorney who will assist them and advise them in negotiating the terms of a settlement agreement. After the two spouses meet with their individual attorneys, the four parties will meet together to discuss the terms of the divorce and try to reach an agreement. If a collaborative divorce cannot be reached the proceedings must go on to the court system. In these cases the collaborative attorney cannot represent their client in the court proceedings. The goal of a collaborative divorce is to peacefully settle all the terms of the divorce through a series of negotiations. A successful collaborative divorce will end with both parties agreeing on all the aspects of the divorce.

How do I Get a Divorce in NJ?

Divorce and Family Law
Divorce Definition and Ring

In many areas of the United States the steps for filing for a divorce are very similar with very few differences. Some states even provide kits for uncontested divorces which can be filled out and submitted to the court clerk without the use of a family law attorney. But in most cases it is better to have a family law attorney on hand to help the couple work through the various and unique circumstances they may be facing. One thing that many people neglect is the court jurisdiction where the petition for divorce is to be filed. Most of the time the state or county has regulations regarding residency that must be met before a divorce is filed. Most have a minimum period of residency that must be fulfilled before the court will have the jurisdiction to even hear the case.