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Tag: Getting a Divorce

Common Questions About Divorce

Questions About DivorceIf you are considering filing for divorce in the near future, you’ve no doubt skimmed articles in magazines, or scoured the internet on that subject … this is probably why you are reading this blog post right now.  Suffice it to say that filing for divorce and the time until the decree is rendered, can be a long and painful journey for most.  Some couples are able to go through the process amicably, but, for most couples, it is a lot of clawing and scratching until it is finally over.

You may have questions before undertaking this big step in your life.  Peruse this article, or others, and then consider consulting with a top notch divorce attorney right here in New Jersey to represent your interests and guide you through the legal process.  That attorney will be happy to answer any and all of your questions, but, in the interim, you might be able to find some answers to common questions about divorce below:

Divorce Laws in New Jersey

Divorce Laws NJWhen day-to-day existence is intolerable due to fractures in your marriage, there is sometimes no other remedy than to file for divorce.  For some, marriage counseling or living apart will work to slowly repair the damage in your marital bonds, but, sadly, for some it is a lost cause. Your best bet when considering filing for divorce is to consult with a reputable top family lawyer in New Jersey.  This specialty of the law will garner you the expert advice that you need to get through the entire divorce process.  Filing for divorce and the actual decree of divorce will not happen overnight, thus, you will need guidance and the expertise of a counselor to get through this process.

Divorce and Social Media

Divorce and Social Media

Sadly the statistics don’t lie.  It is estimated that some 40 to 50 percent of all marriages end in divorce courts these days.  What can we attribute this to?  Was the picking of a permanent partner more carefully thought out back in our parents’ day?  Perhaps couples just agreed to disagree and kept a stiff upper lip and carried on with the relationship for the sake of the children.  By the time the children were grown and out on their own, the polite air of civility was the norm and the relationship was comfortable, so the marriage continued until one or the other passed away.

Today though, our society seems less content to just be satisfied with making do in the relationship “until death do us part” and perhaps this accounts for the fact that nearly half of all marriages are doomed for divorce.  Of course, there are the exceptions like needing to extricate oneself from a threatening relationship where domestic violence is present or when one’s spouse has addiction issues which seem unlikely to be resolved, even through counseling, thus, there is a resignation that divorce will be the answer.

Yet, domestic violence and addiction issues cannot account for all the divorces that crowd the family law docket these days.  Why has the sanctity of marriage and a relationship that was so treasured become so seemingly disposable?

How Does Divorce Work

How Does Divorce Work?

Sadly, the rate for marriage ending in divorce has escalated in the past few years/decades.  Once upon a time people married and stayed together, through thick and thin, for life.  Often, though there were irreconcilable differences, people stayed together for the sake of the kids as they knew the turbulence of divorce and the divisiveness that results is often difficult on the kids.  But sometimes the relationship becomes intolerable and you seek an exit, vowing that you will not let the kids suffer the consequences of this faltered relationship.

What Assets are Split in Divorce?

All our lives we acquire and lose things. We buy, we sell, trade and borrow. We spend all day at jobs to buy the things we desire. It’s not only physical things that we acquire however. We also acquire retirement plans, bank accounts, investments, and debts. We gain some of these things before marriage and some during. If and when these marriages come to an end assets must be divided between spouses. This is never easy and it’s important to understand your rights so that you receive a fair settlement. It’s wise to get a good understanding of exactly what the value of all these assets are and to hire some professionals such as an attorney and an accountant or actuary to help with this process.

Retirement Planning and Divorce

Going through divorce means big changes for both parties. Daily life changes drastically, new lifestyles must be built, and assets must be divided. It takes a lot of planning and careful consideration in order to protect yourself and your fair share of your assets in divorce. There are many tricky things to divide up from homes and vehicles to bank accounts and retirement plans. Tricky or not, retirement plans are often one of the largest assets that couples have to divide in divorce and are therefore extremely important. In order to make sure that you are getting your fair share you’ll need to have a deep understanding of what you are legally entitled to as well as probably hire a qualified attorney to help you sort the matter out.

How do I Get a Divorce in NJ?

Divorce and Family Law
Divorce Definition and Ring

In many areas of the United States the steps for filing for a divorce are very similar with very few differences. Some states even provide kits for uncontested divorces which can be filled out and submitted to the court clerk without the use of a family law attorney. But in most cases it is better to have a family law attorney on hand to help the couple work through the various and unique circumstances they may be facing. One thing that many people neglect is the court jurisdiction where the petition for divorce is to be filed. Most of the time the state or county has regulations regarding residency that must be met before a divorce is filed. Most have a minimum period of residency that must be fulfilled before the court will have the jurisdiction to even hear the case.